Whole Way Housing Initiative by the NIA 2021 2

• • • • The NIA's • • • •

Whole-Way Housing Initiative

Providing a secure reintegration into society is critical to successful rehabilitation, decreasing recidivism, decreasing wasted tax money, and decreasing crime.
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THE MISSION

Dignified Housing for Post Incarcerated 2

Comfortable, Dignified Housing

Peer Support by certified professionals

Peer Support by Certified Professionals

Mental Emotional Substance Abuse Care

Mental, Emotional, & Substance Abuse Care

Financial services planning

Financial Services Planning

Employment Assistance

Employment Assistance Services

Navigate Parole

Probation & Parole Navigation

Im Human Too

A Terrible Cycle

Individuals released from prison – especially the ones without a familial support system – face daunting challenges imposed by society to rebuild their lives. Roberta, a 36-year-old mother of five who was incarcerated in Georgia for three years, lacked answers to so many questions when she was released in April 2020: Will my felony record prevent me from finding suitable housing? How can I support my family if my record prevents me from getting a job? How do I deal with the lasting trauma from life in prison?

 

These and more are the questions of everyone returning “home” after incarceration. Many end up without a roof over their head and without a job, putting them back into a cycle of poverty and potential crime. In Georgia, two out of three people released from prison are rearrested within three years and they often deal with poverty, mental illness, and substance use disorders, problems that only worsen with incarceration. This is especially true for those without a support system on the outside.

Im Human Too

A Terrible Cycle

Individuals released from prison – especially the ones without a familial support system – face daunting challenges imposed by society to rebuild their lives. Roberta, a 36-year-old mother of five who was incarcerated in Georgia for three years, lacked answers to so many questions when she was released in April 2020: Will my felony record prevent me from finding suitable housing? How can I support my family if my record prevents me from getting a job? How do I deal with the lasting trauma from life in prison?

These and more are the questions of everyone returning “home” after incarceration. Many end up without a roof over their head and without a job, putting them back into a cycle of poverty and potential crime. In Georgia, two out of three people released from prison are rearrested within three years and they often deal with poverty, mental illness, and substance use disorders, problems that only worsen with incarceration. This is especially true for those without a support system on the outside.

Ending the Cycle

The premise behind the NIA’s Whole Way Housing Initiative is simple: formerly incarcerated persons are human beings who must be supported with dignity, so they can become productive members of society. Our principles of restorative justice create the framework to rebuild the person’s soul, repair the damage they caused as much as possible, and deal with the damage and trauma they experienced in prison, all to heal the individuals, their families, and communities.

Ending the post incarceration cycle
Ending the post incarceration cycle

Ending the Cycle

The premise behind the NIA’s Whole Way Housing Initiative is simple: formerly incarcerated persons are human beings who must be supported with dignity, so they can become productive members of society. Our principles of restorative justice create the framework to rebuild the person’s soul, repair the damage they caused as much as possible, and deal with the damage and trauma they experienced in prison, all to heal the individuals, their families, and communities.